SAFETY INFORMATION

WARNING

Improper operation of this vehicle could result in serious injury or death.


NEVER:
•    Operate without necessary guide and training. 
•    Operate on road, you may have a traffic collision. 
•    Operate at speeds beyond your skills, the conditions and terrain. 
•    Overload the vehicle when driving. 
•    Operate with more than one passenger.
•    Operate on paved roads - pavement may seriously affect handling and control.

 

ALWAYS:
•    Use proper driving skills, when driving on hills, rugged roads and sharp turns, to avoid rollover.
•    Wear goggles, helmet and protective clothing.

 

WARNING: ALWAYS USE AN APPROVED, SUITABLE HELMET AND PROTECTIVE GEAR FOR OPERATOR AND PASSENGER.
 

WARNING: NEVER USE DRUG OR ALCOHOL BEFORE OR WHEN RIDING.
 

WARNING: Read, understand, and follow all of the instructions and safety precautions in this manual and on all product labels. Failure to follow the safety precautions could result in serious injury or death.
 

WARNING: The engine exhaust gas from this product contains CO, which is deadly gas and could cause headache, giddy, disgusting or lose consciousness, even death.

GENERAL PRECAUTIONS

Avoid Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

All engine exhaust contains carbon monoxide, a deadly gas. Breathing carbon monoxide can cause headaches, dizziness, drowsiness, nausea, confusion and eventually death. Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that may be present even if you do not see or smell any engine exhaust.
Deadly levels of carbon monoxide can collect rapidly, and you can quickly be overcome and unable to save yourself. Also, deadly levels of carbon monoxide can linger for hours or days in enclosed or poorly ventilated areas. To prevent serious injury or death from carbon monoxide: 
•    Never run the vehicle in poorly ventilated or partially enclosed areas.
•    Never run the vehicle outdoor where engine exhaust can be drawn into a building through openings such as windows and doors.

 

Avoid Gasoline Fires and Other Hazards
Gasoline is extremely flammable and highly explosive. Fuel vapors can spread and be ignited by a spark or flame many feet away from the engine. To reduce the risk of fire or explosion, follow these instructions: 
•    Use only an approved gasoline container to store fuel. 
•    Never fill the gasoline container in the vehicle cargo box or on the vehicle - an electrical static discharge may ignite the fuel. 
•    Strictly adhere to fueling procedure. 
•    Never start or operate the engine if the fuel cap is not properly installed. Gasoline is poisonous and can cause injury or death. 
•    Never siphon gasoline by mouth. 
•    If you swallow gasoline, get any in your eye(s), or inhale gasoline vapor, see a doctor immediately.  
•    If gasoline spills on you, wash with soap and water and change your clothes

 

Avoid Burns from Hot Parts

The exhaust system and engine become hot during operation. Avoid contact during and shortly after operation to avoid burns.

SAFE OPERATION - RESPONSIBILITIES

Owner - Be Responsible

Read this Owner’s Manual thoroughly and take a training course if available. 


Always inspect and confirm the safe operating condition of your vehicle prior to ride.


Always follow the maintenance schedule described in this Owner’s Manual.


Never allow anyone to operate your vehicle unless they have read this Owner’s Manual and warning decals on this vehicle and can fully understand them. Advise your new drivers of vehicle operation, driving rules and limits (e.g., whether they can carry passenger, what they may do with the vehicle, where they may ride, etc). Be sure that all operators and passengers meet the qualifications below and agree to follow the safety information. 


Operator - Be Qualified and Responsible

Read this Owner’s Manual and the warning decals on this vehicle carefully. Take a safety training on open areas if available. Practice at low speeds. Higher speeds require greater experience, knowledge and suitable riding conditions. Become completely familiar with the operational controls and the general operation of the vehicle. 
This vehicle is an ADULT VEHICLE ONLY. Operation is prohibited for anyone under 16 years of age. Be tall enough to be properly seated: back against the backrest with the seat belt fastened, to hold the steering wheel with both hands and still be able to reach the full stroke of brake and throttle pedals with the right foot and to firmly plant left foot on the footrest. 
Have a proper driver’s license in accordance with local laws.

 

Carrying Passenger

Only carry one passenger. The passenger must be properly seated in the passenger seat.
The passenger must be at least 12 years old and tall enough to always be properly seated: back against the backrest with seat belt fastened, holding both handholds, and feet firmly planted - right foot on the footrest and the left foot on the vehicle floor. 
Never carry a passenger who has used drugs or alcohol, or is tired or ill. These slow reaction time and impair judgment. Instruct the passenger to read the vehicle’s safety labels.
Never carry a passenger if you judge his ability or judgement insufficient to concentrate on the terrain conditions and adapt accordingly. More specifically for side-by-side vehicles, the passenger must also pay constant attention to the terrain ahead and be able to brace for bumps. 

 

Riding Carefully

•    This vehicle is not a toy and can be hazardous to operate. This vehicle handles differently from other vehicles, such as motorcycles, cars. A collision or rollover can occur quickly, during abrupt maneuvers such as doing sharp turns, acceleration or deceleration and driving on hills or over obstacles, if you fail to take proper precautions.
•    Never operate at excessive speeds. Always go at a speed that is proper for the terrain, visibility, and operating conditions, and your experience. 
•    Never attempt jumps, side slides, donuts or any other stunts. 
•    Never attempt rapid acceleration or deceleration when performing a sharp turn. This may result in a roll over. Never attempt skidding or sliding. If vehicle starts to skid or slide, counter steer in the direction of skidding or sliding. On extremely slippery surfaces, such as ice, go slowly and be very cautious in order to reduce the chance of skidding out of control. 
•    Always be sure there are no obstacles or people behind the vehicle when reversing. Pay attention to blind spots. When it is safe to proceed in reverse, go slowly. 
•    Never exceed the stated load limits for this vehicle. Cargo must be properly secured. Reduce speed, allow for greater braking distance and follow other instructions in this manual. 
•    Ensure that the cargo is well distributed in cargo box. Otherwise, it could change the center-of-gravity and may result in rollover.

 

Occupant Restraint System

•    This vehicle is designed to carry one driver and one passenger, both wearing proper protective gears. 
•    The driver and passenger must latch the side doors and wear the seat belts at all times when riding. 

 

Terrain Condition

•    Avoid sharp turns, abrupt acceleration and sudden braking when passing public roads. 
•    Always go slowly and be extra careful when operating on unfamiliar terrain. Always be alert to changing terrain conditions when operating this vehicle. Take the time to learn how the vehicle performs in different environments. 
•    Never operate on excessively rough, slippery or loose terrain until you have learned and practiced the skills necessary to control this vehicle on such terrain. Always be especially cautious on these kinds of terrain. 
•    Never operate this vehicle on hills too steep for the vehicle or your abilities. Practice on small inclines. 
•    Always follow proper procedures for climbing or going down hills. Never go over the top of any hill at high speed.
•    Never attempt steep hills or side hilling when pulling a trailer.
•    Always check for obstacles before operating in a new area. Always follow proper procedures when operating over obstacles or fallen trees.
•    Never operate this vehicle in deeper water or fast flowing water. Remember that wet brakes may have reduced stopping ability. Test your brakes after leaving water. If necessary, apply them several times to let friction dry out the brakes. 
•    Always ensure to properly park the vehicle on the flattest terrain section available. Put shift lever in PARK, stop engine, remove key before leaving the vehicle. 
•    Never assume that the vehicle will go everywhere safely. Sudden changes in terrain caused by holes, depressions, banks, softer or harder “ground” or other irregularities may cause the vehicle to topple or become unstable. To avoid this, slow down and always observe the terrain ahead. If the vehicle begins to topple or rollover, the best advice is to immediately steer in the direction of the rollover. Never attempt to prevent a rollover with your arms or legs. You should keep your limbs inside the cage.

PREPARE TO RIDE

Before you Go
Perform pre-ride inspection to confirm the safe operating condition of your vehicle.
Refer to PRE-RIDE INSPECTION subsection.

 

Driver and passenger must:
•    Be properly seated. 
•    Latch both side nets and fasten seat belt.
•    Wear appropriate riding gear. (Refer to RIDING GEAR subsection below.)

 

Riding Gear

It is important that the operator and passenger always wears appropriate protective clothing and apparel.
1. Helmet
An approved helmet can protect the head and brain from injury.
2. Eye Protection
Ordinary glasses or sunglasses are not sufficient eye protection for riders. They can shatter or fly off, and they allow wind and airborne objects to reach the eyes. A helmet with face protection or a pair of goggles offer better eye protection. Eye protection must be shatterproof and kept clean.
3. Gloves
A pair of off-road gloves with knuckle protection can protect your hands in the event of an accident or a rollover.
4. Boots
Sturdy over-the-ankle boots with non-slip soles offer more protection and allow you to plant your foot properly on footrest.
5. Clothing
Wear long sleeves and long pants to protect arms and legs. Pants with knee protection and jackets with shoulder protection offer better protection for riders.

AVOID ACCIDENTS

Avoid Rollovers and Tipovers
Side-by-side vehicles handle differently from other vehicles. Side-by-side vehicles are designed to handle off-road terrain (for example, their wheel base and track width, ground clearance, suspension, drivetrain, tires, etc.), and, as a result, can overturn in situations where vehicles designed for use primarily on paved or smooth terrain may not. 
A rollover or other accident can occur quickly during abrupt maneuvers such as sharp turns or hard acceleration or deceleration when turning, or when driving on hills or over obstacles. Abrupt maneuvers or aggressive driving can cause rollovers or loss of control even in flat open areas. If the vehicle rolls over, any part of your body (such as arms, legs, or head) outside of the cab can be crushed and trapped by the cage or other parts of the vehicle. You can also be injured by impact with the ground, cab or other objects.
To reduce the risk of rollovers:

 

Use care when turning.

•    Adjust steering inputs accordingly to your speed and environment.
•    Slow down before entering a turn. Avoid hard braking during a turn. 
•    Avoid sudden or hard acceleration when turning, even from a stop or low speed.
•    Never attempt donuts, skids, slides, fishtails, jumps, or other stunts. If vehicle starts to skid or slide, steer in the direction of the skid or slide. Never slam the brakes and lock the wheels.
•    This vehicle is built primarily for OFF-ROAD purposes. Riding on paved surfaces may seriously affect vehicle handling and control – if you must drive on paved surfaces for a short distance, reduce speed and avoid abrupt inputs to steering wheel, accelerator and brake pedals.
This vehicle can roll over sideways or tip over forward or backwards on slopes or uneven terrain.
•    Avoid side hilling (driving along the slope rather than up or down a hill). When possible, drive straight up and down inclines rather than across them. If you must side hill, use extreme caution and avoid slippery surfaces, objects, or depressions. If you feel the vehicle start to rollover or slide sideways, steer downhill if possible.
•    Avoid steep hills and follow procedures in this manual for climbing and descending hills.
•    Sudden changes in terrain such as holes, depressions, banks, softer or harder ground or other irregularities may cause the vehicle to tip or become unstable. Observe the terrain ahead and slowdown in areas of uneven terrain. 
This vehicle will handle differently when carrying or pulling a load.
•    Reduce speed and follow instructions in this manual for carrying cargo or pulling a trailer.
•    Avoid hills and rough terrain.
•    Allow more distance to stop.

 

Be prepared in case of rollover
•    Latch side doors and fasten seat belt to help you avoid sticking out arms or legs.
•    Never grab the cage while riding. Hands can be crushed between the cage and the ground in a rollover. Keep hands on the steering wheel or handholds.
•    Never try to stop a rollover using your arms or legs. If you think that the vehicle may tip or roll,  the driver should keep both hands on the steering wheel and the left foot firmly planted on the floor. The passenger should keep both hands on the handholds and both feet firmly planted on the floor. 

 

Avoid Collisions

At higher speeds, there is an increased risk of losing control, particularly in challenging off-road conditions, and the risk of injury in a collision is greater. Never operate at excessive speeds. Always go at a speed that is proper for the terrain, visibility, and operating conditions, and your experience. This vehicle does not have the same kind of protection for collisions as a car; for example, there are no air bags, the cab is not fully enclosed, and it is not designed for collisions with other vehicles. Therefore, it is particularly important to fasten seat belts and latch side doors and wear proper riding gear.

AVOID ACCIDENTS

RIDING YOUR VEHICLE


Practice Exercises
Before you go out for a ride, it is very important to familiarize yourself with the handling of your vehicle by practicing in a controlled environment. Find a suitable area to practice and perform the following exercises. It should be at least 45 m by 45 m, free of obstacles like trees and rocks.

 

Turning Exercises
Turning is one of the most frequent causes of accidents. It is easier for the vehicle to lose traction or rollover if you turn too sharply, or go too fast. Slow down when you approach a turn.
•    First learn how to perform slight right turns at very low speeds. Release the throttle before turning and slowly reapply the throttle when turning. 
•    Repeat turning exercise but this time maintain the throttle at the same level while turning. 
•    Finally, repeat turning exercise while accelerating slowly.
•    Practice exercises turning on the other side.
Note how your vehicle reacts in these different exercises. We recommend releasing the throttle before entering a turn to help initiate directional change. You will feel the lateral force increasing with the speed and with your steering input. The lateral force should be maintained as low as possible to make sure it does not cause the vehicle to roll over.

 

U turn Exercises
Practice doing U turns.
•    Accelerate slowly and while remaining at low speed, gradually turn the steering wheel to the right until you have completed the U turn. 
•    Repeat U turn exercise with different 
As mentioned before in this manual, do not ride on paved surfaces as the vehicle behavior will not be the same, increasing the risk of rollover. 

 

Braking Exercises
Practice braking to get familiar with the brake response.
•    Do it at low speed first, then increase the speed. 
•    Practice braking in straight line at different speeds and different braking force. 
•    Practice emergency braking; optimal braking is obtained in straight line, with high force applied, without locking the wheels. 
Remember, braking distance depends on vehicle speed, load and the type of surface. Also, the tires and brakes conditions play a major role.

 

Reverse Exercises
The next step involves using the reverse.
•    Install 1 cone marker on both sides of the vehicle beside each rear wheel. Move the vehicle forward until you can see the cone markers, then stop the vehicle. Acknowledge the distance required to see obstacles behind you.
•    Learn how the vehicle handles itself in reverse and reacts with steering inputs. 
•    Always perform this reverse exercise at slow speeds.
•    Become familiar with the usage of the override function. Do not steer while using the override as it increases the risks of rollover 

 

Emergency Engine Stopping Exercise 
Learn how to stop your engine quickly in an emergency situation.
While running at low speed, simply turn the ignition key to the off position.
This is to familiarize you with the vehicle’s reaction when the engine is turned off while driving and to develop this reflex.

 

Off-Road Operation
The very nature of off-road operation is dangerous. Any terrain, which has not been specially prepared to carry vehicles, presents an inherent danger where terrain substance, shape and steepness are unpredictable. The terrain itself presents a continual element of danger, which must be knowingly accepted by anyone venturing over it. 
An operator who takes a vehicle off-road should always exercise the utmost care in selecting the safest path and keeping close watch on the terrain ahead of him. The vehicle should never be operated by anyone who is not completely familiar with the driving instructions applicable to the vehicle, nor should it be operated on steep or treacherous terrain.

 

General Riding Techniques
 

General Driving Tips

Care, caution, experience and driving skill are the best precautions against the hazards of vehicle operation. Whenever there is the slightest doubt that the vehicle can safely negotiate an obstacle or a particular piece of terrain, always choose an alternate route. In off-road operation, power and traction, not speed, are important. Never drive faster than visibility and your own ability to select a safe route permit. Never operate the vehicle if the controls do not function normally. See your dealer. 
 

Operating in Reverse 
When operating in reverse, check that the path behind the vehicle is free of people or obstacles. Pay attention to blind spots. When it is safe to proceed in reverse, go slowly and avoid sharp turns.
NOTE: In reverse operation, the engine RPM is limited thus limiting the vehicle reverse speed.

 

Crossing Roads
If you have to cross a road, ensure to have complete visibility on both sides for incoming traffic and decide on exit point on other side of road. Drive in a straight line toward that point. Do not make sharp direction changes or abrupt accelerations as it may result in a rollover situation. Do not travel on sidewalks or bicycle trails as they are designated specifically for those uses.

 

Riding on Paved Surfaces
Avoid paved surfaces. This vehicle is not designed to operate on paved surfaces and is more likely to roll over. If you must drive on pavement, turn gradually, go slowly, and avoid abrupt acceleration and braking.

 

Shallow Water Crossing 
Water can be a unique hazard. If it is too deep the vehicle may “float” and topple. Check the water depth and current before you attempt to cross any water. Water depth should not exceed 30 cm (12 inches) for vehicle to safely cross the obstacle. Beware of slippery surfaces such as rocks, grass, logs, etc., both in the water and on its banks. A loss of traction may occur. Do not attempt to enter the water at high speed. Water will affect the braking ability of your vehicle. Make sure you dry the brakes by applying them several times after the vehicle leaves the water. 

 

Riding on Snow or Ice
When performing pre-ride inspection, pay special attention to riding on Paved Surfaces. Avoid paved surfaces. This vehicle is not designed to operate on paved surfaces and is more likely to roll over. If you must drive on pavement, turn gradually, go slowly, and avoid abrupt acceleration and braking.

 

Shallow Water Crossing
Water can be a unique hazard. If it is too deep the vehicle may “float” and topple. Check the water depth and current before you attempt to cross any water. Water depth should not exceed 30 cm (12 inches) for vehicle to safely cross the obstacle. Beware of slippery surfaces such as rocks, grass, logs, etc., both in the water and on its banks. A loss of traction may occur. Do not attempt to enter the water at high speed. Water will affect the braking ability of your vehicle. Make sure you dry the brakes by applying them several times after the vehicle leaves the water.

 

Riding on Snow or Ice
When performing pre-ride inspection, pay special attention to locations on the vehicle where snow and/or ice accumulations may obstruct visibility of the tail lamp, clog ventilation openings, block the radiator and fan, and interfere with the movement of controls. Before starting with your vehicle, check the steering, throttle and brake pedals for interference free operation.
Whenever this vehicle is ridden on a snow covered drive path, the tire grip is generally reduced causing the vehicle to react differently to control inputs from the operator. 

 

Riding on Sand
Sand and riding on sand dunes is another unique experience but there are some basic precautions that should be observed. Wet, deep or fine sand may create a loss of traction and cause the vehicle to slide, drop off or become “bogged” down. If this occurs look for a firmer base. Again, the best advice is to slow down and be watchful of the conditions. When riding in sand dunes it is advisable to equip the vehicle with an antenna type safety flag. This will help make your location more special attention to locations on the vehicle where snow and/or ice accumulations may obstruct visibility of the tail lamp, clog ventilation openings, block the radiator and fan, and interfere with the movement of controls. Before starting with your vehicle, check the steering, throttle and brake pedals for interference free operation.
Whenever this vehicle is ridden on a snow covered drive path, the tire grip is generally reduced causing the vehicle to react differently to control inputs from the operator.

 

Riding on Sand
Sand and riding on sand dunes is another unique experience but there are some basic precautions that should be observed. Wet, deep or fine sand may create a loss of traction and cause the vehicle to slide, drop off or become “bogged” down. If this occurs look for a firmer base. Again, the best advice is to slowdown and be watchful of the conditions. When riding in sand dunes it is advisable to equip the vehicle with an antenna type safety flag. This will help make your location more visible to others over the next sand dune. Proceed carefully should you see another safety flag ahead.
Riding on Gravel, Loose Stones or Other Slippery Surfaces 
Riding on loose stones or gravel is very similar to riding on ice. They will affect the steering of vehicle, possibly causing it to slide and tip over especially at high speeds. In addition, braking distance may be affected. Remember that “gunning” the throttle or sliding may cause loose stones to be ejected rearwards and could hit other people.

 

Crossing Obstacles
Obstacles on the “trail” should be traversed with caution. This includes rocks, fallen trees, and depressions. You should avoid them whenever possible. Remember that some obstacles are too large or dangerous to cross and should be avoided. As a guideline, never attempt to cross an obstacle higher than the ground clearance of the vehicle. Small rocks or small fallen trees may be safely crossed – approach obstacle at low speed and as much as possible at a right angle. Adjust speed without losing momentum and do not accelerate abruptly. Passenger must grasp handholds firmly and brace feet on the floor.

 

Hill Driving Conditions
When driving on hills or slopes, two things are highly important: be prepared for slippery surfaces or terrain variations and obstacles and brace yourself properly inside vehicle. If you climb or descend a hill that is too slippery or has too loose a surface, you can lose control. If you go over the top of a hill at high speed, you may not have time to prepare for the terrain on the other side. Avoid parking on a slope. Always put the shift lever in PARK when stopped or parked, especially on an incline, to avoid rolling. If you must park on a steep incline, block the wheels using rocks or bricks. 

 

Uphill Driving
Use the low range (L) for uphill driving. Due to its configuration, this vehicle has very good traction even while climbing, so much so that tip over is possible before traction is lost. For example, it is common to encounter terrain situations where the top of the hill has eroded to a point that the hill peak rises very sharply. This vehicle is not designed to negotiate such a condition. Take an alternate route. If you feel that the slope is getting too steep to climb, apply brakes to immobilize vehicle. 
Put shift lever in reverse (R), and back down the hill, barely releasing brakes to remain at low speed.
Do not attempt to turn around. Never coast down hill while vehicle is in neutral. Do not perform hard braking as it increases the risk of tipover. 

 

Downhill Driving
This vehicle can climb steeper slopes than it can descend safely. Therefore, it is essential to assure that a safe route exists to descend a slope before you climb it. Decelerating while negotiating a slippery downhill slope could “toboggan” the vehicle, causing it to slide. Maintain steady speed and/or accelerate slightly to regain control. Never slam brakes and lock the wheels.

 

Side Hilling
WARNING: Improper side hilling or turning on hills could cause the vehicle to be out of control or roll over and may result in serious injury or death.
Whenever possible, side hilling (driving across a slope rather than up or down it) should be avoided. If necessary, do so with extreme caution. Side hilling on steep inclines could result in rollover. Avoid all objects or depressions that will intensify the raising of one side of the vehicle higher than the other, thus causing rollover. If you feel the vehicle start to rollover or slide sideways, steer downhill if possible.

 

Recreational, Group and Distance Riding 
Stay away from areas designated for other types of off road use. This includes snowmobile trails, equestrian trails, cross country ski trails, mountain bike trails, etc. Join a local side-by-side vehicle club. It will provide you with a map and advice or inform you where you can ride. Never ride under the influence of alcohol or drugs, or tired or ill. Always keep a safe distance from other riders.
 

Environment
One of the benefits of this vehicle is that it can take you off the beaten path away from most communities. However, you should always respect nature and the rights of others to enjoy it. 
Chasing wildlife is illegal in many areas. Wildlife can die of exhaustion after being chased by a motorized vehicle. Observe the rule... “What you take in, carry out”. Do not litter.

 

MOVING LOADS AND DOING WORK

Working with your Vehicle
Your vehicle can help you perform a number of different light tasks ranging from snow removal to pulling wood or carrying cargo. The equipped accessories can change the vehicle handling. To prevent possible injury, follow the instructions and warnings in this manual and on the vehicle. Always respect the load limits of the vehicle. Overloading the vehicle can overstress the components and cause failure.

 

Carrying Loads
The load limit of the vehicle, including the weight of operator, passenger, cargo, accessories and trailer tongue weight: 310 kg (682 Ib). Following are examples of suitable total vehicle load distribution:

 

Vehicle Settings When Carrying Load
When the total load exceeds 180 kg, including weight of operator, passenger, cargo, accessories and trailer tongue weight, inflate the tires to maximum pressure 70 kPa (10 PSI) Front, 152 kPa (14 PSI) Rear.

 

NOTE: When carrying heavy loads in cargo box, readjust suspension accordingly.
NOTE: When carrying heavy loads in cargo box or pulling a trailer, operate with the shift lever in L (low range).

 

Loading the Cargo Box
Cargo box load capacity: 230 kg (506 Ib)

 

Operating While Carrying a Load
Reduce your speed when carrying cargo and turn gradually. Avoid hills and rough terrain. Allow more distance for braking.
WARNING: Never operate when fully loaded on hills steeper than 15 degrees.

 

Tilting the Cargo Box
The cargo box can be tilted to ease unloading. Use release handles on either side of cargo box.

 

WARNING: 
•    Always ensure no one is standing behind the cargo box before you actuate the release handle.
•    The load weight may affect the operation of the cargo box tilting feature (tilting or lowering).
To lower the cargo box, simply push on the cargo box.

 

WARNING: 
•    Keep yourself and others clear of the cargo box and vehicle frame junction when lowering cargo box.
•    Ensure to securely latch the cargo box and the tailgates before riding.

 

Hauling a Load
Never pull a load by attaching it to the cage; this can cause the vehicle to tip over. Use only the trailer hitch or winch (if installed) to pull a load. When pulling loads with a chain or cable, ensure that there is no slack before starting and maintain tension while pulling. When hauling a load, respect the maximum hauling capacity.

 

WARNING: Slack can cause the chain or cable to break and snap back.
 

When pulling another vehicle, be sure that someone is controlling the pulled vehicle. They must brake and steer to prevent the vehicle from going out of control. Before pulling loads with a winch, refer to the winch Owner’s Manual. Reduce your speed when hauling a load and turn gradually. Avoid hills and rough terrain. Never attempt steep hills. Allow more distance for braking, especially on inclined surfaces. Be careful not to skid or slide.
 

Pulling a Trailer
If a trailer is used behind the vehicle make sure that its hitch is compatible with the one on the vehicle. Make sure the trailer is horizontal with the vehicle. Use security chains or cables to secure the trailer with the vehicle. Improperly loading a trailer may cause loss of control. Respect the recommended maximum hauling capacity and maximum tongue load. Make sure there is at least some weight on the tongue. Always make sure load is evenly distributed and safely secured on the trailer; an evenly balanced trailer is easier to control. Always put the shift lever to L (low range) for hauling a trailer. When stopped or parked, block the vehicle and trailer wheels from possible movement. Use caution when disconnecting a loaded trailer; it or its load may topple on you or others. When hauling a trailer, respect the following maximum hauling capacity.

 

MAXIMUM HAULING CAPACITY: Trailer load allowed 150kg (331lb); Tongue Weight allowed 50kg (110lb)

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CONTACT US

#307, 3rd floor, Urbanek Office
Ulaanbaatar 14251, Mongolia

E: tsog@FourWheeler.mn

M: +976 8888 3888

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